The Skulls Representation in Fashion

skull fashion

After an ominous indication of grief, the skull has moved beyond Halloween and crossed over into mainstream style. Skulls in colors and sizes adorn everything from, mens silk ties, scarves and children's onesies to women's bikinis. Rock this trend that's omnipresent together with its origins' knowledge and rise to prominence.

The skull, with its departure head grin, remains an ageless and unmistakable sign of mortality. Skulls began to be utilized in 16th and 17th century art as a indication of memento mori, Latin for "remember that you will need to die." The skull is connected like William Shakespeare and Edgar Allan Poe who used departure with writers and poets. One of the very well-known and enduring scenes in cinema history is when the title character in Shakespeare's "Hamlet" keeps the skull of the court jester, Yorick.

Skulls, skeletons and skulls with crossbones are used to indicate danger. Bottles or tags with these symbols may mean that they feature poison. Pirate ships bore the skull and crossbones logo in their sails as a warning. The favorite Disney "Pirates of the Caribbean" franchise that began in 2003 helped reestablish the prevalence of pirates and the associated eyesight, including the skull.

Skulls in jewelry and clothes have been favored by bands and musicians in many genres such as Goth punk rock, and metal. The logo helped communicate the notion of rebellion, outsider and status. Fans of these bands began dressing in skull clothing, which has become a symbol elastic enough to signify one or more among these fashions.

Famous due to his fashion and unconventional style screens, acclaimed fashion designer Alexander McQueen, helped popularize the skull. His signature logo was that the lace skull-print and the skull scarves he made are hunted one of fashion lovers. The Alexander McQueen tag lasted making men's and women's clothing and accessories with the logo that was favored after the passing of McQueen . Designer Lucien skulls with design with his sweaters. Perhaps the costliest skull ever was the 1 performer Damien Hurst made "For the Love of God" in 2007. It was created from the platinum cast of a century skull. Encrusted with 8,601 diamonds infused in the skull along with the teeth, the sculpture was valued at around $100 million.

Everything Skull 


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